Tag Archives: Bedtimes

How well are the kids talking? Ethnic differences in children’s verbal abilities

How well our kids are doing is important to us all. The better they are doing early on in life, the better they’re likely to be doing further down the line as they grow into teenagers and adults. The earlier we can get to grips with any disadvantages or inequalities faced by individuals and groups of people, the sooner we can do something about it. In this research, a team from the ESRC International Centre for Lifecourse Studies has been looking at young children’s verbal abilities to see if there are any differences between different ethnic groups in how they are getting on with talking.

Ethnic differences in longitudinal latent verbal profiles in the millennium cohort study is research by Afshin Zilanawala, Yvonne Kelly and Amanda Sacker and is published in the European Journal of Public Health.

Photo credit: U.S. Embassy Pakistan

Breastfeeding – to a schedule or on demand?

Mums-to-be are frequently advised in baby books that feeding to a schedule is best for their  child. But what does the evidence tell us when it comes to the different approaches and what might that mean for parents, practitioners and policy makers?

Dr Maria Iacovou from the University of Cambridge presents recent evidence breastfeeding research at an ESRC Centre for Lifecourse Studies Policy Seminar.

Photo credit: clogsilk

Related links

The Effect of Breastfeeding on Children’s Cognitive and Non-cognitive Abilities, Labour Economics 19, 2012.

The effects of breastfeeding on children, mothers and employersResearch project information, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex.

Time for bed! Is a child’s bedtime linked to how well they are getting on?

What are the links between a child’s bedtime, their reading ability and their behaviour over time? See the slides and listen to Professor Yvonne Kelly talk at a Policy Seminar about her research Changes in Bedtime Schedules and Behavioral Difficulties in 7 Year Old Children.

Photo credit: Tom Leuntjens